Why don’t efforts at employee engagement work?

“Despite corporate initiatives to improve engagement and more and more training of front-line leaders, engagement in most organizations just doesn’t improve.”

By Kevin Kruse

Effective leaders care about employee engagement because they know that engaged employees give more effort–not just the required effort to do their jobs, but the discretionary effort needed to excel. Engaged sales people sell more, engaged service reps provide better service, assembly line workers have fewer accidents and the discretionary efforts of all lead ultimately to better profits and better shareholder returns.

Yet, despite corporate initiatives to improve engagement and more and more training of front-line leaders, engagement in most organizations just doesn’t improve.

Employee-Engagement Partnership

Company leaders can do a myriad of things to try to engage their employees, but if the employees don’t feel like they’re partners in the process, engagement doesn’t usually happen. If you want engaged employees, you have to engage them.

Taking lessons from the positive psychology movement and author Kevin Kruse, here are three things leaders can do to increase employee engagement (and happiness):

1. Have employees identify the motivation triggers that matter most to them

The four primary drivers of motivation and employee engagement are: Communication, Growth, Recognition, and Trust. But each of these things will matter to us differently based on our personality and career stage. I may really crave growth opportunities at the early stage of my career, while you might be more interested in recognition as you approach retirement.

2. Teach employees to be mindful of all that their company and manager is already doing to drive engagement

To continue reading Kevin’s article click on Co2

Illustration Credit:

john.b.wright.iii@gmail.com'

Author: johnbw3

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