Ace Your Interview And Land Your Dream Job!

Congratulations! You nailed the phone interview and were invited to attend an in-person interview to meet with the hiring manager. Anxiousness is a normal feeling prior to an interview and the only way to quell that feeling is through thorough preparation. In this segment, I will cover some key areas to guide you in putting your best foot forward.

Dress for the part

Dressing to impress is one of the most important, yet overlooked elements of preparing for an interview. The importance of being well dressed for your interview cannot be stressed enough. Under no circumstance should you be wearing jeans or flip flops (this includes Crocs) to your interview. Guys- ensure that your shirt is well-pressed and wear a belt. Ladies- make sure that your choice of clothes is appropriate and classy.

Be tasteful: Do not wear any competitor logos for the interview.

This is your first opportunity to make stand out from the crowd. Make it count! Dress for the part; it’s always better to be overdressed than underdressed.

Time Is Important

Be on time for your interview. It is recommended that you are on site for your interview around 15 minutes prior to your scheduled interview time. Being on time shows the hiring manager that you are respectful of their time and serious about the opportunity that they have presented to you. This would also be an opportunity for you to familiarize yourself with the area to see if it’s an area that you would be comfortable working in for the 52 weeks of the year!

Building A Connection

Building connections with someone that you barely know and whose judgement will be deciding whether or not you will land your dream job is daunting. Thankfully, the internet provides ample resources to learn more about your interviewer prior to the interview. I would strongly recommend LinkedIn as a resource to get to know your interviewer. Hiring managers seek candidates who light up the room with their personality and enthusiasm. Whether you have passion for the brand, the company, the field, the team or just simply life, this is a highly sought after quality in an employee! Be excited about the opportunity and let your personality shine through!

Situational Questions

The STAR technique of answering situational questions is the most recommended method of forming a coherent answer. STAR stands for Situation(what happened?), Task (what was the issue?), Action ( what did you do to fix the issue?) and Results (what happened as a result of your action?). The STAR technique provides a framework in which it forces you to cover the situation, task, action and results; making it easier for the interviewer to follow along and provide a coherent answer to an open question.

Ask Questions

At the end of the interview, the hiring manager will ask you if you have any questions for him/ her. This is your opportunity to ask any burning questions that you may have at the back of your mind. Asking questions to the hiring manager shows your interest in the role and the company. Typically, I would recommend that you have two or three top questions about the team or the company that are important to you. Salary and benefits questions should be reserved for when the offer is on the table, during the negotiation stages.

Thank You

Within 24 hours of your interview being concluded, it’s a good idea to send a thank you note to the manager to show appreciation for their time through email or hand delivered card.

Good luck and looking forward to your success!


Opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and not of The HR Gazette or its team members.

Author: Stefany Ting

Stefany Ting has over 10 years of experience in recruitment for a plethora of markets, spanning several extensive industries including the hospitality, entertainment, retail, automotive and consumer packaged goods markets. Passionate about volunteerism, she is an active member of the HRPA and volunteers her time through mentoring . Additionally, Stefany achieved her Certified Human Resources Professional (CHRP) designation and is actively pursuing her Certified Human Resources Leader designation (CHRL).

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